Propagating Old Roses part 2

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Mountain Home Cemetery – the “new” section

Mountain Home Cemetery has been in existence since 1849 and is the resting place for Kalamazoo’s most prominent families. When walking through the 28 acres familiar names, names I see every day on street signs and public buildings, show up on old worn gravestones, statuary or monuments to themselves.

Sometime soon, I’ll take a walk through the whole place and show off this Victorian gem. But I promised that I would attempt to propagate a rose I saw yesterday while driving by the old cemetery.

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You can see the rose from the street. 

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I think I’m too early. I should really wait until the flowers are done blooming. Well, I do a few today, and try again in a week or two when they are done.

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Isn’t this a pretty flower? The thorns are very sharp.

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You can’t see very well, but the last name is Patterson and the date is 1858-1920. So can I assume that the rose dates back to the 1920’s?

I found this really nice website that gives a lot of information on Antique and Heritage roses and its where I got my how-to’s on how to propagate roses. It’s Morrison’s Gardens and they very clearly state that they do not sell old roses, they just collect them.

 I brought home my twigs and cut them about 6 inches long, leaving a few leaves. I stripped a little bark off the bottom and dipped it in root hormone. At this point, if I were following the mason jar method, I would stick the cane in the ground outside and cover it with a jar, creating a little greenhouse environment. I will try that with the next batch; today I am doing a modified version of the mason jar. I am potting the twigs and keeping them indoors for now, using zip loc bags instead of jars. Now we have to wait and see.

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About Jill-O

a girl who likes lakes, trees and critters; making an attempt at living the artistic life.
This entry was posted in flowers, gardening, Michigan and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Propagating Old Roses part 2

  1. Cathy says:

    Beautiful Roses, good luck with the propagation.

  2. Jill says:

    Are there other roses at that cemetery?

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